BD sent me photos of my dolphin! They contacted me saying there was an issue with the colors because I asked for it to be translucent. The colors blended together and were hard to tell apart they said. They told me I could take this one or change the colors to something that would work better. These colors are pretty much exactly what I wanted though so I chose to take it.

So far my experiences with BD’s customer service have been great, but I’ve received way too many flawed toys for me to keep buying from them until they show improvement

Posted 4 hours ago / 10 notes / Reblog

enigmacodebreaker:

if you don’t view mentally ill people and mentally disabled people as—y’knowpeople

and if you cannot find it in yourself to do so, asshole

  • do not become a psychologist 
Posted 10 hours ago / 1,549 notes / autisticfandomthings / Reblog

parliamentrook:

reptila-tequila:

casting & custom posing of a springbok trio by travis de villiers at relive taxidermy, south africa. [source for all images]

final product:

image

art

Posted 11 hours ago / 544 notes / tigerskinsandotherthings / Reblog

wapiti3:

Candle-snuff - Xylaria hypoxylon on Flickr.

Ray Purser Photography

Posted 11 hours ago / 9 notes / wapiti3 / Reblog

transperceneige:

Knabstrupper by Juliane Meyer.

Posted 13 hours ago / 4,830 notes / verhkrys / Reblog

trynottodrown:

wolves-whales-and-waves:

griseus:

The marine eels and other members of the superorder  Elopomorpha have a leptocephalus larval stage, which are flat and transparent. This group is quite diverse, containing 801 species in 24 orders, 24 families and 156 genera (super diverse). 

Leptocephali have compressed bodies that contain jelly-like substances on the inside, with a thin layer of muscle with visible myomeres on the outside, a simple tube as a gut, dorsal and anal fins, but they lack pelvic fins. They also don’t have any red blood cells (most likely is respiration by passive diffusion), which they only begin produce when the change into the juvenile glass eel stage. Appears to feed on marine snow, tiny free-floating particles in the ocean.

This large size leptocephalus must be a species of Muraenidae (moray eels), and probably the larva of a long thin ribbon eel, which is metamorphosing, and is entering shallow water to finish metamorphosis into a young eel, in Bali, Indonesia.

Is it just me or does he look REALLY excited about where ever (s)he’s going?

i just looked at the face and now this post is million times better

Posted 1 day ago / 4,313 notes / ichthyologist / Reblog
c